… imagine if women led the world…
… imagine if women led the world…

Some of the latest and most valued thinking on the current state of women in leadership from inspiring women.

Women and Leadership: Real Lives. Real Lessons

Highly impactful and inspirational book by two women leaders – Julia Gillard and Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala. Two women surrounded by scores of male counterparts meet at various gatherings with a common purpose: to explore why women are still outnumbered at senior echelons, what their experience is and what can be done about it.

Approaches by Female Political Leaders – with Jennifer Curtin from University of Auckland
The Science Behind Women Leading with Alexis Kanda-Olmstead
The Impact of Unconscious Bias on Women Leaders with Robin Hauser
Short 3 Minutes of Advice on Being a Female Leader from a Female Leader
Advice from British Women Leaders on Being a Leader
Sheryl Sandberg in 2010 on Why There Are So Few Women Leaders – Changed Much?
Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead

The best-selling book that sparked worldwide discussion about women in leadership and became a catch-cry for empowering women. From then COO of Facebook, Sheryl Sandberg.

The World’s 100 Most Powerful Women

Forbes set out in 2019 to identify the most powerful women in the world. They used a set of metrics to qualify their contenders: money (GDP, net worth, assets under management, or revenue), mentions in the media, impact (population, employee count) and influence spheres. They considered both hard power for example currencies and constitutions, dynamic power such as audiences, communities and creative influence as well as soft power as in what are leaders doing with their influence – all within the context of each woman’s area: politics, business, technology, finance, media and philanthropy. For those seeking insights into power and influence, it makes for essential reviewing.

Go here to explore the details – https://www.forbes.com/power-women/#22603e2d5e25

Female Leaders in the Pandemic

Taiwan, Germany, New Zealand. They have two things in common: 1. they have handled the pandemic better than other countries, and 2. they have women leaders.

Is that second point a coincidence or a lesson?

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/04/14/asia/women-government-leaders-coronavirus-hnk-intl/index.html

Madeleine Albright on Women Leaders

Hell and Other Destinations. A 21st Century Memoir.

A memoir from a highly successful woman who reached one of the most senior levels in the USA enabling her a starring role on the world stage. A fascinating read and lessons to be learned for future women leaders.

As the first female Secretary of State in the USA, Madeleine Albright was forthright and demonstrated her innate talent for the role in a world dominated by men. Politics aside, her capacity to rise and settle in a male-dominated political echelon is worth reviewing for insights. Her memoir, Hell and Other Destinations: A 21st Century Memoir, exhibits her intelligence, experiences and lessons for other women aiming for senior roles. And at 82, she still has chutzpah. Have a look at it now online. The article below from the Herald is a taster.

https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/there-is-no-room-for-mediocre-women-madeleine-albright-on-females-and-leadership-20200316-p54alo.html